‘MANY BRIDES WANT TO COORDINATE THEIR PERFUME

Choosing fragrances for your wedding (and your maids, your ’moon, your groom…) can be confusing. So let Brides contributing beauty editor, Olivia Falcon, introduce you to the brilliant blends that cover all bases.

‘MANY BRIDES WANT TO COORDINATE THEIR PERFUME Photo Gallery



with their flowers, and the rule is not to be too literal,’ says fragrance expert Vicci Bentley. ‘Perfumers don’t aim to replicate the fragrance of flowers, but their atmosphere.’ For example, Marc Jacobs’ Daisy White (1; £78 for 100ml, johnlewis.com) captures the innocence of the daisy (which doesn’t have an obvious scent), with white violets and jasmine for an aura of warmth: ‘A daisy is a friendly flower,’ says Jacobs. ‘Not precious, not exotic, but it evokes a spirit in lots of women.’ With this in mind, there are plenty of ways you can use the symbolic meanings of flowers.

IN MUCH THE SAME WAY AS YOU HAVE A MASTER PLAN

For the look and feel of your big day, buttonholes to complement your bouquet and matching wedding bands, when it comes to choosing your fragrance, you need to clue in your groom, too. ‘You don’t want him walking down the aisle in something incredibly sporty or – worse – a scent that will overpower you,’ warns fragrance expert Jo Fairley, who often points newly engaged friends towards the Penhaligon’s Fragrance Profiling Service (penhaligons.com).

A wonderfully immersive experience, it guides couples through various fragrance families to choose harmonious blends that won’t clash at the altar. ‘Applying your chosen scent is an art form,’ adds perfumer Roja Dove. ‘For those of you happily dabbing it behind each ear, don’t! It’s a cardinal sin. The sebum glands will interfere with the perfume and alter the scent that develops. Instead, wear it on wrists, elbows and collarbone. A body lotion with the same fragrance as your perfume is a great way to make the scent last, too.’

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