fashion 90s

Fashion has taken over the airwaves on news programs, on music videos, on sitcoms, dramas, soap operas, even on cooking shows (“Bobby Flay’s wardrobe provided by . . .”). The average American watches three hours and forty-six minutes of TV each day. By age sixty-five, we will have spent nearly nine years of our lives glued to the tube. While every TV show, except for public access or PBS, is about commerce in some way due to commercial breaks, fashion programs in particular are inherently about the big sell. Although the buy-buybuy pitch isn’t quite as blatant as on the Home Shopping Network or in an infomercial, the underlying theme of consumerism in fashion programming isn’t difficult to see. Clothes featured on shows like E!’s Fashion Emergency, for instance, are not only shown on-air but also credited up the wazoo. As makeover subjects schlep in and out of the dressing room, brand names and prices flash across the bottom of the screen. At some point in the program, one of the resident fashion experts, like Leon Hall or Brenda Cooper, will inevitably proclaim something like, “Now, Janine, doesn’t Escada just make the loveliest jackets?” You can’t blame the producers and experts for being highly biased toward their gracious fashion sponsors. They’d have no show otherwise. In order to produce a TV show about fashion (on a reasonable budget), you must rely on the generosity of clothing companies and designers. Fashion “experts” aren’t customarily paid to appear on these shows, but there’s no shortage of takers. Todd Oldham’s MacGyver-like do-it-yourself segments on House of Style in the early 1990s weren’t just charity; designers, like experts in other fields, appear on shows for self-promotion. Likewise, when Old Navy teamed up with MTV for a back-to-school clothes giveaway contest, it wasn’t generosity driving the retailer. The promos for the contest featured none other than Molly Sims, who just happened to be working double duty as an Old Navy spokesperson and host of House of Style and Mission Makeover on MTV. On MTV’s special, Fashionably Loud, models showed off the season’s hot looks, set to live music. Alas, the show wasn’t just pure entertainment; buying information for the clothes appeared on the channel’s website.90’s fashion on Pinterest | 90s Fashion, Hip Hop Fashion and The 90s Allnewhairstyles

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