EXERCISES JUMP HIGHER

McGregor saw more potential in accelerometers, because unlike GPS devices, accelerometers can capture not just speed and distance information but also much higher-resolution information about stride characteristics. In his work in cycling, McGregor was not interested in technique, because he understood that the importance of pedaling technique in cycling is small (because the fixedly rotating pedals basically force every cyclist’s legs to move the same way). But he rightly recognized that stride technique is a major factor in running, so he decided to use accelerometers instead of GPS devices in his research with runners, which began in 2005. An accelerometer is a fairly simple mechanism that essentially measures the speed and direction of its own movement. In his work with runners, McGregor used triaxial accelerometers, which measure accelerations in all three planes of movement: forward-backward, up-down, and side-toside. He and his colleagues and students performed a few interesting studies using these devices, and they have several others planned. McGregor’s first study demonstrated that data from running accelerometers could be used to accurately estimate the oxygen cost of running and thus to quantify a runner’s training load over time.1 Other studies used accelerometers to identify signature differences in the stride characteristics of trained and untrained runners and to identify changes in stride characteristics associated with fatigue.2 Some of the findings confirmed truths about running biomechanics that had been previously discovered through other forms of measurement, whereas other findings taught us things about running biomechanics that had not been previously known. As expected, McGregor found that trained runners accelerated less in all three planes of motion. At any given speed, the members of the nationally ranked Eastern Michigan University cross-country team whom McGregor used as subjects bounced up and down less, moved less from side to side, and lost less forward momentum between strides than did the non-runner students in the study. But there were also differences within the pool of trained runners, with the fastest runners tending to accelerate least in all three planes. This finding suggested that some runners were gifted to be more economical than others, but McGregor’s studies also produced compelling evidence that training enhanced stride efficiency in a highly specific manner. Fascinatingly, McGregor found that trained runners were rather uneconomical walkers and were even somewhat inefficient at running speeds that were slower than their habitual training speeds. One in particular, who had the highest VO2max on the team, was among the least economical members of his team at a slow jog. McGregor speculated that this runner wasted a lot of energy at these speeds because, thanks to his huge aerobic engine, he could afford to. Because he never ran slowly to the point of exhaustion and hence never subjected his body to the crisis required to force a more efficient stride to delay exhaustion at those specific speeds, his body seemed not to have bothered adapting to the slow running.Protein meals for work, explosive leg workouts to jump higher … Allnewhairstyles

EXERCISES JUMP HIGHER

Increase Your Vertical Leap- Exercises on How to Jump Higher … Allnewhairstyles

EXERCISES JUMP HIGHER

Dominate the Competition, Part 3: How to Jump Higher for … Allnewhairstyles

EXERCISES JUMP HIGHER

Vertical Jump Training | Allnewhairstyles

EXERCISES JUMP HIGHER

Maybe You Like Them Too

Leave a Reply

5 + 4 =